Tag Archive | "Electric Bikes"

Eye-catching Smart is far from Pedestrian

Eye-catching Smart is far from Pedestrian

Smart Electric Bike Review – Art of Smart bought to two-wheels

No-one can have failed to have noticed that things are afoot in the world of Big Auto. The wind of change that electrification has set blowing through personal transport is being felt in corporate office headquarters, from Frankfurt to Detroit. And it’s no longer just the four-wheeled world being jolted by the potential of electric drive-trains. Audi, VW, Toyota, Ford: the list of purpose-built e-bikes fluttering off the drawing-board, and onto the auto show-stand, just keeps on growing.

The reason is simple. The e-bike market promises a veritable tornado of growth – and the auto-manufacturers want to be ready to catch a sail-full of that breeze. But for all the high-concept e-bike chic being paraded at the shows, it’s taken nimble niche-player Smart to be the first auto company to bring a serious e-bike offering to the masses. Since May in the UK and Germany (and from 2013 in the US and Canada) the Smart e-bike has been pushed as the next big step in the electric bike revolution. The question asked by some, though, is – just how clever have Smart really been here?

New synergy for the ‘third way’

There is certainly an interesting new synergy at play. Up until now, most of the serious unit-shifting for e-bikes has been through bicycle manufacturers, shoe-horning their models into the electric way of doing things. Auto companies, like Smart, however, are tackling the e-bike solution from the other direction – seeing the electric bike as a point of entry for a new mass personalized transport market – one entirely separate from pedal bikes, or indeed automobiles.

They have a point. And because of their gargantuan marketing power – and deep pockets – it’s one that they can make quite forcefully. The Smart e-bike is now in a position to test the hyped ‘third way’ for personal transport, to see if it can be made to stand tall. It has the force of a major auto- manufacturer standing behind it – in this case Germany’s Daimler, Smart’s owner. And it has the reputation for intelligent – if quirky – design, earned from Smart’s range of eponymous two-seaters.

Uber-excitement for the urbanite?

But for all of Smart’s cleverness in design – of which there is plenty on display with the Smart e-bike – the project will fly-or-fall on whether the bike meshes properly with its intended new market. Because make no mistake, the Smart e-bike is looking for a new market: seeking to hook up with the urban mainstream. Smart are happy to leave the envelope-pushing to the e-bike specialists and backroom hobbyists. As Smart CEO Dr. Annette Walker said at the launch: “We at smart have been gathering experience of electric drives and the mobility needs of city dwellers around the world for years. The smart e-bike is the logical product of this experience.”

Which isn’t to say that the Smart e-bike is staid, or simply evolutionary. It is packed nicely with subtle innovation. But this isn’t a bike for the sports-fan or the speed-freak. It is the everyday journeys of the bolder urbanite-set that figures in Smart’s plan for this e-bike. So exactly what sort of smarts does the Smart e-bike have to offer them? Well, let’s start with the gloss.

Looks a-plenty

Visually the Smart e-bike has plenty of appeal – it maybe even be a design classic-in-waiting – one that manages to look futuristic, without falling off the cliff into sci-fi silliness. A lot of that has to do with a handful of bold clean lines, bought to the fore by a lack of clutter: no wires, no gangling gears, minimal spoking and tight razor tires. And lot of it has to do with a handful of bold colours: the designers have made a clever brand tie-in to the Smart electric car visuals, with its distinctive neon-green-on-white marking. Everyone will know you’re riding a Smart, when you’re zipping past at the traffic light queue.

So there’s plenty to catch the eye of potential buyers. But at around US$3,800 a bike (£2,495 in the UK, or €2,849 in Europe), there has to be plenty of function behind the form. So what sort of a transport experience does the Smart e-bike have to offer? More to the point, will you even be able to zip past anything much more than stationary traffic, when pushing on the pedals of the Smart e-bike?

Motor, Gears and Drive

As pedelec drive technology goes, Smart has decided to bend a middle course between innovator and journeyman. The motor is a decidedly underwhelming 250W BionX rear-wheel hub unit (200W in the UK, though this will be 350W for the US and Canada), pushing out a maximum of 35 Nm of torque. The motor’s assist is limited to just 15mph (24kph), before it cuts out. So far, so pedestrian.

But remember, Smart’s e-bike is aiming to ease the commute and shopping trips of city-dwellers, to provide a viable alternative to expensive car journeys or erratic public transport. Many of its riders will be new to e-biking. Ease of use and reliability will trump raw performance for them. And their motor supplier – the Canadian firm BionX – has proven popular, putting out some 40,000 units a
year. They help provide a measure of confidence that the heart of the Smart’s power will be prove to be steadfast.

The motor can be flipped between 4 levels of assistance, going all the way from zero to heroic, through an integrated SRAM I-Motion 3-speed hub gear system. But it is with the drive-belt itself that Smart starts to get really clever. Out goes a gnarly metal-linked chain, and in comes a sleek Gates carbon-toothed belt, which – with its 118 high-strength teeth – weighs in a little less than 3 ounces (80 grams). A straight-as-a-die chain-line, with no lubricant, no maintenance, and no trouser rips. What more could the style-conscious, time-constrained commuter ask for?

Brakes, Batteries and Charging

Braking comes courtesy of a pair of hydraulic Magura MT4 perforated disc brakes, which Smart claim will provide excellent performance even in wet weather. And that loss of kinetic energy on braking isn’t wasted – a recuperative braking system flips the motor into generator-mode, pushing power back into the battery as you slow. That extra fillip of efficiency is probably needed; the battery itself is on the sufficient side, rather than the stellar.

Weighing in at 6.6 pounds (3 kg), the 48V/10amp lithium-ion battery is loaded with 423W of electric energy, when fully-charged. Smart believes that its e-bike users can squeeze 62 miles from this battery, using the lowest-assist mode. No doubt their range estimate relies on a gradient-free route, along sweetly-paved roads. But with most commutes and shopping trips likely to be safely

under 20 miles all-round, the ‘Smart-set’ are pretty unlikely to find themselves on an unassisted ride, pedalling the flat-battery back home. In fact, riders can even switch the motor into generator mode, and recharge the battery as they cycle, if they’re feeling energetic.

Getting charge back into the battery from the mains grid is hassle-free. The battery is detachable, and can be topped up independently of the e-bike itself. Getting from flat-to-full should take 5 hours, whilst a partial recharge, from 20% to 80%, can be achieved in as few as 3 hours. Smart has pegged the battery to 500 charging cycles, factoring in an 80% residual capacity.

Gadgets and Options

So the Smart e-bike brings plenty of style, and a measure of technical innovation – but what else do Smart offer to win over the city crowd? One of the more attention-grabbing features is a USB socket on the integrated control panel. This allows for ‘charging in motion’ for whatever device you happen to plug in (smartphones and sat-nav immediately spring to mind). It will also, no doubt, please those umbilically connected to their personal e-device of choice.

The control panel itself is slick, if functionally basic, showing battery status, the current assist mode and basic bike computer outputs. It is also easily removed from the e-bike, adding another layer of security – the motor will fail to start without the correctly installed control panel. The forks are suspension free – presumably because this is not an e-bike destined for off-the-road shenanigans – and the overall package weighs in at sturdy (26.1 kg) 51 pounds. Optional extras include a smartphone cradle, luggage rack, and a choice of handlebar and seat designs.

The ultimate extra?

Of course, one way of looking at Smart’s e-bike is as a giant optional extra in itself. As we’ve already said, there is a symbiotic branding tie-in to the electric Smart car; plenty of marketing shots showing Smart-car-plus-Smart-ebike, a wonderfully cosy coupling. That may lead many to dismiss the Smart e-bike as more of a promotional gimmick for the Smart car brand, than a stand-alone e-bike in and of itself. Undoubtedly there’s some truth in that, but such synergy is, naturally enough, a two-way thing.

The Smart car-brand appeals to an audience that is already prepared to think – and travel – out of the box. That may allow Smart to be the first auto-maker to seriously tap – and grow – the e-bike audience beyond early adopters and hobbyists. If so, be prepared to see Big Auto breaking out of their ‘concept bike’ mind-set, and starting to hit the cycle lane in force. After all, the wind will be behind them.

Smart Electric eBike from toni margarit on Vimeo.

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Interbike 2012 Displays Voltage Cycles First Production Ebike

Interbike 2012 Displays Voltage Cycles First Production Ebike

Voltage Cycles, an innovator in personal transportation, announces the Voltage Cycles Sport, the company’s first production electric bike. The Sport features classic American styling and engineering to meet the demands of everyday transportation.

“The Voltage Cycles Sport is for anyone who wants to integrate a healthy, environmentally friendly, and economical form of transportation into their lifestyle,” said Marty Schlesinger, President of Voltage Cycles. “Voltage Cycles represents the new road ahead for personal transportation, and we are looking to earn our place in the family garage.”

Read the complete article at: Voltage Cycles Unveils First Production Electric Bicycle at Interbike 2012

or check out their website at: http://www.voltagecycles.com/

 

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The Jetson Ebike is Really a Moped

The Jetson Ebike is Really a Moped

So says EVWorld and so says anyone who looks at it. If the pedals are placed in such a way that it’s impossible to pedal them – it’s a moped!

In addition, the Jetson weighs 125 pounds. That would be totally impractical to peddle as well.

Read the complete article at:
Jetson E-Bike More LIke Electric Moped

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Audi Freestyle Wheelie Electric Bike Review

Audi Freestyle Wheelie Electric Bike Review

Audi Electric Bike Review

The German car and motorcycle manufacturer Audi is about to enter the electric bicycle market –  the top-of-the-line electric bicycle market. Audi unveiled their electric bike prototype at the Wörthersee car expo In May 2012. (Each May, the Volkswagen and Audi car show is held in the Austrian town of Reifnitz, adjacent to Lake Worth (Wörthersee) The car expo is typically just called Wörthersee.)

Audi’s entry into the electric bike market is significant for many reasons. Firstly Audi purchased the Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati in April this year for a reported $1.2 Billion. This gives Audi access to a worldwide dealership and distribution network. Automakers are realising that the future of transport will cover the full spectrum of vehicles and fuel types. The big auto brands have an unprecedented opportunity to expand their product range and brands into new markets that have traditionally not been their domain of expertise. The lines will continue to blur and Audi along with BMW and Smart are introducing commuter and performance electric bikes.

Also, while Europe and Asia have embraced the electric bike, citizens of the United States are still dragging their heels on adopting this technology (as well as that of electric motorcycles and electric cars.) Many US cities are undergoing planning changes that will increase cycle ways and reduce the reliance on the motor vehicle. Combined with the electrification of many forms of transport the combined effect on the electric bike market look promising.

Audi, which is owned by Volkswagen, is one of the largest car companies in the world, with the finances to conduct research into electric vehicle technology and bring a design successfully from the prototype to the display floor. Audi’s prototype electric bike, provisionally called the Wörthersee, has been making currents (that’s an attempt at a pun…) since it was unveiled. This is for many reasons – but the main one is that it is pushing the limit of what an electric bike can do and push beyond the traditional rider. The Audi ebike is a trick cycling bike, coming with two “wheelie modes,” automatic stabilization while tricks are being performend, and the capability of recording those tricks and uploading them to Facebook right from the bike! It’s this integration with software and social media that makes these bikes really interesting. They’ll connect the real world with the virtual world. It is those features that will likely sell this bike to the American sporstperson and convince them that an ebike is so much more that a bicycle with an electric motor.

Lightweight Carbon Fiber Frame

One of the drawbacks of electric bikes to date has been their weight. The battery pack has always been very heavy. This if fine when the battery is fully charged and assisting the bicyclist. But when the bike runs out of juice and the bicyclist needs to ride back home, it can be twice as difficult to reach home – especially if one has to do it by going up a significant grade. The Wörthersee incporporates not only a carbon fiber frame but also wheels of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (if you’re an anagram junkie, that’d be CFRP). The frame weighs 3.53 pounds, and the wheels weigh just 1.32 pounds. (Never fear, the frame is reinforced at load points, so it can bear a hefty amount of weight.) Add the battery to that and the total bike weighs only 46.3 pounds or 21 kg which is an amazing accomplishment in engineering.

Integrated & Interchangable Battery

In addition to being heavy, some electric bikes also looked rather clunky, as the large battery had to be strapped to a carrier on the rear of the bike or attached to the downtube. As the technology improves, ebike designers are coming up with ingenious new places for that battery – as well as the rest of the electronics necessary to run the bike. For the Wörthersee, the Li-ion battery pack and the computer to run it are located within the frame. The battery is easily removable, allowing the rider the choice to bring extra battery packs or ride naked. The battery will charge in about 2.5 hours from a 230 volt plug in.

The Motor

This electric bike is powered by a magnet synchronous motor. Basically it relies on magnets rather than the traditional coil. They are usually used to covert mechanical power to Electricity in large gas, steam, hydro and wind industrial turbines. The introduction of this technology show just how much engineering and design work went into this ebike. The motor has a peak output of 2.3 kW. The maximum torque delivered to the rear wheel is 250 Nm (that’d be Newton meters). The motor and battery is situated at the lowest point on the frame giving the bike a very low center of gravity. The rider controls the output of the motor using a traditional twist grip and can also control the ride modes through the on board computer.

Gears and the Brakes

The Wörthersee has nine gears, and shifting is ridiculously easy and fast with the nine-speed hydraulically actuated gear shift. Which was inspired by the R Tronic Clutch in the Audi R8. Bringing the bike to a stand still is no trouble with the fron and rear hydraulic disk brakes.

On Board Computer & Travel Modes

The Audi has five travel modes. The rider can choose between different balance between the motor and pedals.

  • Pedal-power only
  • Pedal assist
  • Electric only
  • Powered Wheelie mode
  • Balanced Wheelie” mode

‘Pure’ mode allows the rider to pedal the bike without electric assistance. ‘Pedelec’ mode assists the rider with the electric motor up to speeds of 80 kph (50 mph) for a distance of 50 – 70 kilometers (31 – 44 miles). ‘eGrip’ mode powers the electric motor using the standard twist grip found on a motorcycle. ‘Wheelie’ mode controls balance and power output of the electric motor to assist the rider in maintaining balance and control in the wheelie.

Speed

In pedelec mode (pedal assist) the bike can achieve a top speed of 80 kph or 50 mph, with a range of about 70 km or 44 miles on a single charge. In electric-only mode, the top speed is 31 mph.

Wheelies

The Audi Wörthersee is a sport bike, which means riders can pop wheelies and show off their skills. For beginning riders, the Power Wheelie mode allows the rider to adjust the angle of the rear wheel. The Balance Wheelie mode is for experienced riders. (Sounds like a Segway, doesn’t it?)

The Computer and Wi Fi

Everything about this bike is controlled by a computer, and it is also equipped with Wi Fi. In addition to riding, the bicyclist can actually record his ride via his or her smartphone, and upload footage to Facebook if so desired. There’s also an app that lets riders compete against each other with this video footage. The computer screen also shows the speed one is travelling, the distance one has travelled, and the remaining charge in the battery.

The Design

The bike looks slick. There are loads of unique and innovative  design elements on this bike. The Carbon Fiber weaved texture of the frame and wheels helps tie the whole design together. The red accents on the seat, brakes and pedals break up the black and grey of the Carbon nicely. Also, the white of the suspension and battery pack help lighten the design and draw the eye away from the battery. Compared to other traditional sport bikes the Audi is clearly the brain child of a sophisticated industrial design team. It has the right balance between performance and simplicity rarely seen in the over-the-top branding of most sport and mountain bikes.

Availability and Price

Currently the bike is just a concept. Based on the prototype’s materials and high-end components it’s likely to cost upwards of $20,000. This puts it our of reach of most consumers, but then again this is a performance bike. It sits in a new category that is a crossover between freestyle bicycle and motorcross. With all that in mind it’s well within the reach of performance riders who are used to paying upwards of $10,000 for performance mountain bikes. I’m certain Audi will broaden the appeal and lower the price point, as long as they don’t compromise on quality and performance which is unlikely. Either way I’m looking forward to see what the Audi design team comes up with.

The Audi e-bike Wörthersee from MultiVu Video on Vimeo.

Audi e-Bike Wörthersee – Bicicleta electrică ce poate atinge 80km/h from LaCurentNET on Vimeo.

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England’s Western Lake District To Be Equipped With E-Bikes

England’s Western Lake District To Be Equipped With E-Bikes

The West Cumbria Electric Bicycle Network was launched by new business Muncaster Cycles on August 1. The scheme, which allows visitors to travel sustainably using electric bikes, is based at Muncaster Castle. The electric bikes allow riders to cycle normally, but have a battery-powered engine which can be used when the rider gets tired, or it gets too hilly.

Read the complete article at: Electric bike scheme heads out west

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The Evolution of E-bike Law: Shanghai Riders Won’t Need Licenses

The Evolution of E-bike Law: Shanghai Riders Won’t Need Licenses

As more and more ebikes are hitting the streets in practically every major city of the world, the laws of that city have to be modified.

When most people think of an ebike, they think of a bicycle with an electric motor on it. But unfortunately, scooters that have bike pedals are also considered to be ebikes!

Should folks who operate these e-scooters need licenses and learn the laws of the road?

In Shanghai, the current law stands that e-scooter riders (riding scooters with bike pedals on them) do not need licenses.

Read the complete article at:
Electric bike riders won’t need license

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EBike Design Firm Wins $10,000 Prize

EBike Design Firm Wins $10,000 Prize

Henry Chong rode into start his pitch on the electric bike of his design and left the competition with a $10,000 cheque in his back pocket.

The founder and president of Revelo LIFEbike was the winner of the 2012 Up-Start! Competition hosted by MaRS Discovery District in Toronto. He walked away with the grand prize after convincing a panel of four judges his ultra-portable electric bike design was the most viable business model in a 10 minute presentation. Chong was competing against nine other technology or social innovation startups that had completed MaRS’ Entrepreneurship 101 program.

“I knew from competitions I’d done before that it was important to make a splash,” Chong says about his stunt. “It was the right type of product to do something like that with.”

Read the complete article at:
Electric bike design firm races ahead of competition for $10K prize

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Miley Cyrus Rides an E-bike

Miley Cyrus Rides an E-bike

The article from the Daily Mail seems to be gloating over the fact that a $2,000 bike can get a flat, but I think the more important story is that Miley Cyrus is riding an ebike.

She’s been working out like crazy recently and was obviously planning to continue her healthy lifestyle with the purchase of a new $2000 Pedego electric bike.

But Miley Cyrus’ pedal down to her local coffee shop fell flat today as she got a puncture.

Wearing a sleeveless shirt, shorts and a pair of designer Chanel espadrilles, Miley seemed untroubled by the flat tire.

Read the complete article here:
It ain’t easy being green: Miley Cyrus’ new $2000 electric bike gets a flat tire

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Bristol, England: Win an Electric Bike

Bristol, England: Win an Electric Bike

Are you keen to do your bit for the environment and ditch your car, but not sure about making the move to pedal power?

An electric bike could be the solution – and the Post has teamed up with Big Green Week to offer readers the chance to win one of their own, worth nearly £2,000.

The UK’s first festival of environmental ideas, art and culture is taking place from June 9-17 and on the first Sunday, June 10, Park Street will be closed to traffic for the Atmosphere Electric Bike World Championships.

Read the complete article at:
Go green in Bristol and win an electric bike

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Police To Start Using Electric Motorcycles

Police To Start Using Electric Motorcycles

Electric-motorcycle maker Zero Motorcycles has launched a line of 2012 Zero DS bikes designed specifically for police patrols and security agencies. The company says it has been working with security agencies for two years, and this bike is the fruit of that labor.

The Zero DS comes in 6-kilowatt-hour or 9 kilowatt-hour configurations and is rated by the EPA at 70 or 112 miles on a single charge. It has a top speed of 80 mph and features regenerative braking to recoup energy during deceleration.

Charge time varies but a on a standard outlet it should take about 8-9 hours, with the quick-charge kit it takes half that time. It’s rated to 3,000 complete charges before the battery can be recharged only to 80 percent capacity.

Read the complete article at:
Zero Motorcycles launches a line of police-grade electric bikes

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Austin, TX: Rocket Electrics Comes to Austin

Austin, TX: Rocket Electrics Comes to Austin

Nicole Zinn knew she wanted to open an environmentally friendly business that fit into Austin’s Earth-friendly vibe.

When she stumbled across the concept of a bicycle equipped with an electric motor, she said, she knew she was onto something.

“Electric bikes are a good solution to get traffic out of the city,” Zinn said. “With the density of the population, it is easy to just hop on a bike and go.”

From that concept, Zinn in December opened Rocket Electrics, a business that sells and rents the electric bicycles.

The bikes can be ridden like a typical bike, but they are also equipped with a battery-powered electric motor, which is operated through a throttle on the right handlebar. When the throttle is engaged, a rider doesn’t have to use the pedals at all.

Read the complete article at:
Rocket Electrics looks to bring electric bikes into Austin mainstream

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Cedar Crest alum’s bike biz expands to Israel

Cedar Crest alum’s bike biz expands to Israel

Even before he began his studies at the University of Pittsburgh, Micah Toll was an inventor.

While he was a student at Cedar Crest High School, Toll designed portable, lightweight construction beams that could be used to build houses.

At Pittsburgh, Toll, now 23, has worked on building electric bicycles designed for cities and urban centers.

“The goal is to be able to sell these electric bicycles and help replace many car trips with cleaner, more efficient vehicles,” he wrote in an email last week.

Toll will graduate on Sunday with his bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering.

Read the complete article at:
Cedar Crest alum’s bike biz expands to Israel

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Electric Bikes Tap Into Southern California Market

Electric Bikes Tap Into Southern California Market

In search of a speedy, yet green alternate way to get to work, Calvin Phuong used an electric bicycle conversion kit on his bike. The 32-year-old Marina del Rey resident took his modified bicycle for a ride around a parking lot and was amazed by its speed and handling.

“One day my wife and I stopped by an Izip store in Venice and rented a couple electric bikes for the day. We had so much fun, we didn’t want to return them,” Phuong said with a smile.

Read the complete article at:
Electric Bikes Tap Into Southern California Market

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Commuting With an Ebike in Blacksburg, VA

Commuting With an Ebike in Blacksburg, VA

BLACKSBURG, VA –Andy Petersen wants to get his exercise.

“I prefer to get exercise on the way to work,” he said. “Just riding a bike to work is a lot of work every day.” So he came up with a bike with all the usual parts and one unique change. He electrified it.

“I decided what I really need to an optimal electrical vehicle to get to work is something super light weight which is what this frame is and then a redundant power source which is what my legs are.”
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Blacksburg man commutes, saves with electric bike

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Electric Scooter Experiment Over For CSU Police

Electric Scooter Experiment Over For CSU Police

CHICO, California — Twenty-nine months ago, they seemed like an idea whose time had come.

Chico State University was building on a major sustainability campaign, and going green with electric patrol scooters seemed like a way the University Police Department could support the effort in a very visible way.

In October 2009, the department acquired three new police scooters from Diggler, a Petaluma-based company, with the intention of using them to augment campus foot and vehicle patrols, and for parking enforcement.

Plenty fast enough to catch bicyclists and sprinting suspects, with top speeds of around 30 mph, yet also agile and able to traverse cement steps, the scooters seemed like the perfect vehicle for patrolling the campus and nearby congested neighborhoods.

Their economy, with an operating cost of about one cent per mile, couldn’t be challenged, and was a big selling point.

Something seemed out of place from the start, however. As officers jumped on the stand-up scooters for their first trial runs, they looked, and seemed to feel, less official and more vulnerable than on a bicycle or even on foot.

Read the entire article at:
Chico State University police ditching electric scooters

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Electric Bicycle Concept from Vauxhall / Opel

Electric Bicycle Concept from Vauxhall / Opel

Okay so the name is a bit of a mouthful, but once you get a look at what this thing actually is, I can virtually guarantee you will want one. This is a bicycle for the 21st century – or possibly even the 22nd century, now I come to think of it.

The futuristic design seems to have little in common with the bike that is gathering spider webs in my shed at the moment – and I thought that was pretty cool when I bought it.

Anyway, the Pedelec cycle is a thing of beauty. It’s an electric bicycle so if you want to be lazy when you use it you can be. You get the choice of whether to pedal or just sit there and enjoy the view while the electric part takes over. The 250w motor that can power it is indeed pretty RAD.

According to the latest figures the bike should be able to cover anything between forty and ninety miles, depending on charge and the terrain it covers. Unfortunately at the moment this is all in the future, since the actual bike is not available at the moment.

I can only hope for the day when it makes it into reality and is able to be bought from your local bike shop. This is a dream come true for the lazy cyclist who loves riding bikes that look like future tech made possible – and of course I am talking about me here.

Read the complete article at:
Electric Bicycle Concept from Vauxhall / Opel, RAD e Pedelec Cycle

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Filmmaker Joins E-Bike Start-Ups Advisory Board

Filmmaker Joins E-Bike Start-Ups Advisory Board

Conscious Commuter Corporation, a startup focused on reinventing the electric bicycle, today announced that Chris Paine has joined their Advisory Board, according to Bob Vander Woude, President and CEO.

In making the announcement, Mr. Vander Woude stated, “Chris is no stranger to the electric bicycle or sustainable transportation. He will bring valuable expertise to our company as a visionary and an entrepreneur at a time when we are reaching a critical point in our development process. We are thrilled to have him on board.”

Chris Paine’s award winning documentary feature films Who Killed the Electric Car (2006), Revenge of the Electric Car (2011) and Charge (2012, as producer) go behind the scenes to explore the emerging electrification of the vehicle fleet. Mr. Paine’s prior experience includes his technology company, Internet Outfitters, went public in 1999 as part of AppNet/CommerceOne. He also co-founded Mondo-tronics, an educational robotics retailer and materials provider for the Mars Pathfinder mission. Chris’s environmental work includes campaigns to stop nuclear testing in Nevada, slow freeway expansions in northern California, and document oil spills. He also serves on the Advisory Board of the Black Rock Arts Foundation in San Francisco.

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Filmmaker Joins E-Bike Start-Ups Advisory Board

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Galaxy Resources Ltd To Enter Ebike Market

Galaxy Resources Ltd To Enter Ebike Market

AUSTRALIAN miner Galaxy Resources Ltd is eying China’s booming electric bicycle market as it opened an A$100 million (US$106 million) lithium carbonate plant in east China’s Jiangsu Province.

The 17,000 ton-a-year Zhangjiagang plant, the largest of its kind in Asia-Pacific, will use lithium concentrate from Galaxy’s Mt Cattlin mine in Western Australia and process it further to produce high-grade lithium carbonate for the lithium-ion batteries to power the electric bikes.

In an interview Iggy Tan, the managing director, said Galaxy plans to move further up the value chain by setting up a battery-making facility nearby, and the opening of the plant on Wednesday marked a key step in the firm becoming an integrated company from mining to processing in the lithium supply chain.

Tan said the proposed battery plant will make products for electric bikes because of the potential huge growth. He also sees rising demand for lithium battery in the long run as electric vehicles start to take off.

About 30 million electric bikes were made last year in China, and over 90 percent of the cells being produced for electric bikes are lead-based.

Read the source article at:
Aussie miner aims to power electric bikes

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Electric-bike culture clash

Electric-bike culture clash

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND -Since the massive introduction of electric or e-bike culture into Geneva traffic culture, I have been skeptically watching this trend as I dodge errant commuters on their SUV bikes weaving carelessly between vehicle and bicycle lanes. And therein lies the problem.
Know your lane – beware e-bikers

As the Swiss daily 20 Minutes documented last month, e-bikers are accounting for an increasingly growing number of two-wheeled run ins with traffic on the road. Imagine, the motor vehicle department handing out motorcycle licenses to anyone willing to pay 1,500 francs, or the cost of a modest e-bike – this is after all a motorized vehicle. Only many riders have never been on two-wheels before, let alone with a motor attached.

Read the complete article at:
Electric-bike culture clash

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How ‘E-bikes’ Are Changing the Way We Commute

How ‘E-bikes’ Are Changing the Way We Commute

As concerns about congestion, carbon and cost continue to grow, more and more people in the UK are ditching their cars and turning to cycling as an efficient, cheap and enjoyable way to get about. According to the Department of Transport, one in six of us are regular bike users, and with the Times’ popular CycleSafe campaign currently in the headlines, awareness of two-wheeled transport is at an all-time high.

But according to some, the world of cycling is about to change up a gear, as a new form of cycle hits the streets. Electric bikes – or ‘e-bikes’, as they’re known – look like any other bicycle at first glance. Look again, however, and you’ll spot a diminutive but powerful electric motor, powered by a lithium battery and hooked up to a control on the handlebars.

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How ‘e-bikes’ are changing the way we commute

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